The Fitzrovia Partnership is a Business Improvement District representing businesses in the heart of London’s Fitzrovia.

Telephone: 020 3146 4260

info@fitzroviapartnership.com

11 -13 Bayley Street, London, WC1B 3HD

Travel

Travel

Bringing Employees Back to Work

Recovery Phase

Work-related Travel

The UK Government have published a “Safer Travel for Passengers – Easy Read Guide

Travel safely during the coronavirus outbreak

Walking and cycling are the preferred methods of travel during coronavirus. Where this is not possible, use public transport or drive. Workers are advised to support the control coronavirus of by:

  • working safely – this may be working from home, or within the workplace if COVID-secure guidelines are followed closely
  • observing social contact rules
  • washing or sanitising your hands regularly
  • keeping your distance when you travel, where possible
  • avoiding the busiest routes, as well as busy times like the rush hour

Employees should not travel at all, if they:

Staff with symptoms of coronavirus, however mild, should self-isolate for at least 10 days from when symptoms started. Staff not experiencing symptoms but have tested positive for coronavirus should self-isolate for at least 10 days starting from the day the test was taken.

Staff who have tested positive whilst not experiencing symptoms but develop symptoms during the isolation period, should restart the 10 day isolation period from the day symptoms developed.

If anyone in a workers household or support bubble has symptoms of coronavirus, they should stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days.

Cars, accommodation and visits

Objective: To avoid unnecessary work travel and keep people safe when they do need to travel between locations.

Steps that will usually be needed:

  1. Walking or cycling where possible. When not possible, you can use public transport or drive. You must wear a face covering when using public transport.
  2. Minimising the number of people outside your household, or support bubble, travelling together in any one vehicle, using fixed travel partners, increasing ventilation when possible and avoiding sitting face-to-face..
  3. Cleaning shared vehicles between shifts or on handover.
  4. Where workers are required to stay away from their home, centrally logging the stay and making sure any overnight accommodation meets social distancing guidelines.

Deliveries to other sites

Objective: To help workers delivering to other sites such as branches, or suppliers’ or customers’ premises to maintain social distancing and hygiene practices.

Steps that will usually be needed:

  1. Putting in place procedures to minimise person-to-person contact during deliveries to other sites.
  2. Maintaining consistent pairing where 2-person deliveries are required.
  3. Minimising contact during payments and exchange of documentation, for example, by using electronic payment methods and electronically signed and exchanged documents.

Public transport

People must wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England. People will be breaking the law if they fail to do so and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or disability reasons.

Face coverings should be removed if asked to do so by a police officer or other relevant person.It is important to wash or sanitise hands before and after touching your face covering.

If you need to dispose of your face covering, use ‘black bag’ waste bins or litter bins. You should not use a recycling bin.

Planning journeys

Before and during each journey, check with transport operators for the latest travel advice onroutes:

Travel may take longer than normal on some routes due to social distancing measures. Allow more time if journeys involve changes between different forms of transport.

Advise staff to:
  • travel at off-peak times
  • use quieter stations and stops – get off a stop early if it’s less busy
  • keep changes to a minimum, for example, between bus and train
  • walk for more of the journey, for example the first or last mile
  • book tickets online in advance or pay by contactless

On your journey

Face coverings must be worn on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England. People will be breaking the law if they fail to do so and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or disability reasons.

The risk of transmission is small at 2 metres and where possible, people should maintain 2 metres distance.

If people cannot keep a 2 metre distance, reduce the risk to themselves and others by maintaining a 1 metre distance where possible, and taking suitable precautions.

Help keep your workers, other passengers and transport staff safe by advising the following precautions:

  • ensure workers maintain social distancing, where possible, including at busy entrances, exits, under canopies, bus stops, platforms or outside of stations
  • limit the number of people that workers come into contact with, for example avoid peak travel
  • wash or sanitise their hands regularly
  • avoid touching their face
  • cover their mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of their elbow when coughing or sneezing
  • travel side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
  • touch as few surfaces as possible
  • stay outdoors, rather than indoors, where possible
  • minimise the time spent close to other people, where possible
  • avoid loud talking, shouting or singing
  • dispose of waste safely, including items such as used disposable face coverings
  • be prepared to queue or take a different entrance or exit at stations
  • wait for passengers to get off first before they board
  • wait for the next service if they cannot safely keep distance on board a train, bus or coach
  • avoid consuming food and drink on public transport, where possible
  • respect other people’s space while travelling
  • be aware of pregnant, older and disabled people who may require a seat or extra space
  • be aware that not all disability is visible and some people may be exempt from wearing a face covering

Treat transport staff with respect and follow instructions from transport operators. This may include:

  • Notices about which seats to use or how to queue
  • Additional screens, barriers or floor markings
  • Requests to board through different doors or to move to less busy areas.

Taxis and private hire vehicles

  • People should wear a face covering when using taxis or private hire vehicles. A taxi driver or private hire vehicle operator may be entitled to refuse to accept you if you do not wear a face covering.
  • The risk of transmission is small at 2 metres and where possible, you should maintain 2 metres distance.
  • If peoplecannot keep a 2 metre distance, reduce the risk to themselves and others by maintaining a 1 metre distance where possible, and taking suitable precautions.
  • Follow the advice of the driver. For example, people may be asked to sit in the back left-hand seat if travelling alone. People may want to check with taxi or private hire operator before travelling if they have put any additional measures in place.
  • Use contactless payment if possible, or find out if payment can be made online in advance.
  • Be aware of the surfaces touched. Be careful not to touch their face. Cover mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of elbow when coughing or sneezing.
  • When finishing journeys, wash hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise hands as soon as possible.

Enforcement of face coverings on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs

People are not allowed to get on public transport or enter substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs if you are not wearing a face covering, unless there is an exemption or a legitimate reason for not wearing one. Transport staff may tell people not to board or ask them to get off.

Refusal to wear a face covering can receive a fine from the police or Transport for London enforcement officers. The fixed penalty notice will require payment of £100, which is reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days.

Repeat offenders receiving fines either on public transport or in an indoor place will have their fines doubled on each subsequent offence up to a maximum value of £3,200. After the first offence, there will be no discount. As an example, receiving a second fine will amount to £200 and a third fine will be £400. A sixth fine and all subsequent fines will be £3,200.

Checklists for safer travel – Summary

Plan your journey

  • can I walk or cycle to my destination?
  • have I checked the latest travel advice from my transport operator?
  • have I booked my travel ticket online, bought a pass or checked if contactless payment is possible?
  • have I planned my journey to minimise crowded areas and allow for delays?
  • am I taking the most direct route to my destination?

What to take with you

  • a face covering -for longer journeys, take more than one face covering and a plastic bag for used face coverings
  • a plan for the journey
  • tickets, contactless payment card or pass
  • phone, if needed for travel updates, tickets, contactless payments
  • hand sanitiser
  • essential medicines
  • tissues

Social Distancing and Face Coverings >

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