The Fitzrovia Partnership is a Business Improvement District representing businesses in the heart of London’s Fitzrovia.

Telephone: 020 3146 4260

info@fitzroviapartnership.com

11 -13 Bayley Street, London, WC1B 3HD

Image Alt

Checklists

Phased Return – General Operational Considerations

Recovery Phase

  • Workstation/Desk distancing – 2m, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, is acceptable
  • One way systems
  • Avoid persons sitting near high traffic office walkways
  • Staggered arrival and departure times for staff – avoiding peak travel times
  • Provision of additional parking or facilities to encourage active travel (bicycle storage etc)
  • Staggered staff breaks, sitting 2m apart, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, one way system entry/exit for break out facilities
  • Working From Home – splitting teams where possible to allow distancing at the office
  • Flexibility those who use public transport to commute to allow work from home and minimise need to travel to/from work (essential office presence only)
  • Minimise Sit Down Meetings – Essential Meetings Only – Limited attendees
  • Essential Meetings implement distancing measures – 2 metres between, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable
  • Meeting Space Cleansing after each use
  • Push/Pull with foot door entry systems
  • Social distancing indicators for the floor spaces especially at reception / walkways / corridors
  • Sanitisation and cleaning kits for each office to regularly cleanse high contact areas, workstations, phones and computers

Shift patterns and working groups

Objective: To change the way work is organised to create distinct groups and reduce the number of contacts each employee has.

Steps that will usually be needed:

  1. As far as possible, where staff are split into teams or shift groups, fixing these teams or shift groups so that where contact is unavoidable, this happens between the same people.
  2. Identifying areas where people directly pass things to each other, for example office supplies, and finding ways to remove direct contact, such as using drop-off points or transfer zones.
  3. You should assist the Test and Trace service by keeping a temporary record of your staff shift patterns for 21 days and assist NHS Test and Trace with requests for that data if needed. This could help contain clusters or outbreaks. Check what data you need to collect and how it should be managed. These are mandatory test and trace requirements.

Outside of the Workplace

  • Control the number of entry and exit points into and out of the workplace. Consider having separate entrance and exit points if possible
  • Managing outside queues to ensure they do not cause a risk to individuals or other businesses, for example by introducing queuing systems, using barriers and having staff direct customers.
  • Limit the number of customers, visitors and staff accessing the workplace at any time. Assess the size of the workplace and its layout, this will enable you to calculate the number of occupants who can reasonably follow 2 metre social distancing, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable.
  • Use a colleague to meet visitors, explain the social distancing requirements and control the number of visitors entering workplace at any one time. In some circumstances, that colleague may need to be Security Industry Authority (SIA) licensed.
  • Consider whether temporary barriers should be available in case it is necessary to stop people joining a queue.
  • Place clear signage outside of the workplace explaining the social distancing measures in place that visitors and occupants should follow.
  • Place markings outside the workplace to assist correct queue spacings
  • Speak to nearby premises to work together to manage possible shared queuing areas
  • Encourage visitors and occupants to enter the workplace alone wherever possible. Please bear in mind that this is not always possible
  • Schedule deliveries to avoid crowding in delivery areas
  • Consider non-contact deliveries
  • Use of safe outside areas for staff breaks
  • Businesses in high footfall areas should discuss queue management with the local authority or The Fitzrovia Partnership to determine the best way to avoid congestion
  • Consider whether additional security personnel may be required to support colleagues.

Outside of the Workplace

  • Control the number of entry and exit points into and out of the workplace. Consider having separate entrance and exit points if possible
  • Managing outside queues to ensure they do not cause a risk to individuals or other businesses, for example by introducing queuing systems, using barriers and having staff direct customers.
  • Limit the number of customers, visitors and staff accessing the workplace at any time. Assess the size of the workplace and its layout, this will enable you to calculate the number of occupants who can reasonably follow 2 metre social distancing, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable.
  • Use a colleague to meet visitors, explain the social distancing requirements and control the number of visitors entering workplace at any one time. In some circumstances, that colleague may need to be Security Industry Authority (SIA) licensed.
  • Consider whether temporary barriers should be available in case it is necessary to stop people joining a queue.
  • Place clear signage outside of the workplace explaining the social distancing measures in place that visitors and occupants should follow.
  • Place markings outside the workplace to assist correct queue spacings
  • Speak to nearby premises to work together to manage possible shared queuing areas
  • Encourage visitors and occupants to enter the workplace alone wherever possible. Please bear in mind that this is not always possible
  • Schedule deliveries to avoid crowding in delivery areas
  • Consider non-contact deliveries
  • Use of safe outside areas for staff breaks
  • Businesses in high footfall areas should discuss queue management with the local authority or The Fitzrovia Partnership to determine the best way to avoid congestion
  • Consider whether additional security personnel may be required to support colleagues.

Inside Workplace Hygiene and cleaning

Before reopening:

In order to make sure that a workplace that has been closed or partially operated is clean and ready to restart, considerations should include:

  • an assessment for all sites, or parts of sites, that have been closed, before restarting work
  • cleaning procedures and providing hand sanitiser, before restarting work

Steps that will usually be needed:

  1. Checking whether you need to service or adjust ventilation systems, for example, so that they do not automatically reduce ventilation levels due to lower than normal occupancy levels.
  2. Most air conditioning systems do not need adjustment, however where systems serve multiple buildings, or you are unsure, advice should be sought from your heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) engineers or advisers.

Keeping the workplace clean and hygienic:

  • Place clear signage throughout the workplace reminding visitors/customers/occupants of the sanitisation measures and asking them to follow these rules
  • Provision of cleansing stations at workplace reception, or the front of store and all common areas in the building
  • Frequent cleaning of all work areas and equipment
  • Hand sanitiser, if available and Disinfectant wipes or spray and tissue for trolley/basket handles/lifts/reception and all common areas
  • Identify and regularly clean key touch points eg. door handles, lift buttons, keypads, stair/escalator hand rails.
  • Enhancing cleaning for busy areas
  • Providing more waste facilities and increased waste collection
  • Provision of paper towels for hand drying as an alternative to hand dryers
  • Limit or restrict use of high touch items or equipment, eg printers/whiteboards
  • If you are cleaning after a known or suspected case of COVID-19 you should refer to the official government guidance“COVID-19: cleaning in non-healthcare settings”
  • Providing extra non recycling bins for workers and visitors to dispose of single use face coverings and PPE.
  • You should refer to guidance for information on how to dispose of personal or business waste, including face coverings and PPE.

Industry Specific Guidance >

< Social Distancing and Face Coverings